Portland Mayor Supports Removing City Restrictions on Homeless Camping

In a reversal of policy regarding homeless camps in Portland, Oregon, Mayor Ted Wheeler on Thursday proposed new regulations to end the city's ban on “day camping for homeless,” according to local reports.

Wheeler's proposal would reduce “criminal penalties” for camping, according to KOIN 6.

“The City Attorney's Office believes that these proposed new regulations would survive a legal challenge while providing the City with the tools necessary to change the status quo in Portland,” City Attorney Robert Taylor said in a statement. Press release.

PORTLAND CAFE OWNER WARNS CITY IS NOT EQUIPPED TO HELP DRUGS AFTER OREGON NIXES DRUG DECRIMINALIZATION ACT

Portland Mayor Ted Wheeler and the city's homeless

In a reversal of policy regarding Portland's homeless camps, Mayor Ted Wheeler proposed new regulations Thursday to end the city's ban on “homeless day camping.” according to local reports. (Getty Images)

The proposal would make it “illegal for any person to knowingly camp in or on public property or public right-of-way if the person has access to reasonable alternative shelter, has the means to acquire reasonable alternative shelter, or has been otherwise proposed and rejected . another reasonable shelter.”

“The current policy is that campers are prohibited in public parks or near schools and cannot camp on city streets or other public places during the day,” KOIN 6 reported.

Portland is also engaged in a debate over progressive drug decriminalization policies.

Oregon liberals turn around, pass bill to recriminalize hard drugs as overdose deaths soar

Portland homeless camp 2020

Oregon Legislators voted to recriminalize certain drugs after a surge in overdose deaths led the governor to declare a state of emergency over Portland's fentanyl crisis — virtually ending a signature liberal policy. (Rebecca Smeyne/Bloomberg via Getty Images)

Oregon Legislators voted to recriminalize certain drugs after a surge in overdose deaths led the governor to declare a state of emergency over Portland's fentanyl crisis — virtually ending a signature liberal policy.

In 2020, a measure to decriminalize small amounts of all drugs and redirect much of the state's marijuana tax revenue to funding grants for addiction services was passed as part of the measure voting 110, with 58% of Oregon residents approving the measure.

Since then, addiction and overdose death skyrocketed in Oregon and across the country as fentanyl swept across the country.

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Mayor Wheeler's office did not respond to a request for comment from Fox News Digital.

Fox News' Michael Dorgan contributed to this report.

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