Obama celebrates 12 years of Dreamers' executive action

Former President Obama on Saturday celebrated 12 years of his executive action on the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, or “DACA,” program and called on Congress to codify the program into law before it expires.

The Obama administration implemented DACA in 2012, so that those who entered the United States illegally as children would be protected from deportation and have a path to citizenship.

Obama

Former U.S. President Barack Obama speaks during a Forum on Democracy event hosted by the Obama Foundation at the Javits Center in New York, November 17, 2022. (Spencer Platt/Getty Images)

Beneficiaries, called “Dreamers,” could request “consideration of deferred action” for a period of two years, subject to renewal.

ICE SOUNDS ALARM THAT MIGRANTS ARE NOT BEING BROUGHT TO THE BORDER AS FEARS RISE AFTER ISIS ARRESTS

“Today, most of the original Dreamers are adults. They serve their communities as teachers, doctors, lawyers and have children of their own. But because the program that offered them this protection remains temporary, they live also in fear of being sent back to a country that many of them don't even remember,” Obama said in a message on X.

Obama praised the Biden administration for making it easier for Dreamers to access federal programs like health care. But he warned that Dreamers “will continue to live under a cloud of uncertainty” until Congress acts.

“That’s why I’m once again calling on Congress to pass a permanent legislative solution for Dreamers – one that provides them a path to citizenship and makes our immigration system fairer, more efficient, and more just.” , Obama said.

DEFEND DACA

Immigration rights activists participate in a rally in front of the Supreme Court in Washington, DC on November 12, 2019. (Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images)

President Biden will host a White House event next week celebrating the Obama-era initiative as his own administration prepares potential new benefits for other illegal immigrants who have long-standing ties to the United States.

Five people with knowledge of the plan told The Associated Press that White House officials were moving closer to a plan that would leverage the president's executive powers to protect the spouses of U.S. citizens without legal status from deportation, offer them work permits and facilitate their path to permanent status. residency and possibly U.S. citizenship.

However, the timetable for implementing this plan, or even its implementation, remains unclear.

To protect Americans' spouses, the administration should use a process called “in-place parole.” It not only provides deportation protections and work permits to eligible immigrants, but also removes a legal barrier that prevents them from embarking on the path to a green card and, eventually, U.S. citizenship.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

This power has already been used by other immigrant groups, such as members of the U.S. military or their family members who lack legal status.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Source

Leave a Comment